Calendar for the Feast of Trumpets and Other Bible Feasts

2018-2022 Jewish Holiday Calendar

Jewish Rabbi blows Shofar for Feast of Trumpets
Jewish Rabbi man blowing a Shofar in a synagogue for Jewish High Holidays, Feast of Trumpets.

Rafael Ben-Ari / Getty Images

This Bible feasts calendar covers the dates of the Feast of Trumpets and other Jewish holidays over a five-year span: 2018-2022. Use the calendar to plan for future holidays or as a reference to note which dates previous holidays fell on.

The Gregorian Calendar and the Jewish Calendar

In addition to marking the dates for important feast days, the calendar also compares Gregorian calendar dates with the Jewish calendar. An easy way to calculate the Jewish calendar year is to add 3761 to the Gregorian calendar year.

Today, most Western nations use the Gregorian calendar, which is based on the solar calendar, or the position of the sun among the constellations. It is called the Gregorian calendar because it was established in 1582 by Pope Gregory VIII, the head of the Catholic Church.

The Jewish calendar, on the other hand, is based on both solar and lunar movements. Since the Jewish day begins and ends at sunset, the holidays begin at sundown on the first day and end at sundown on the evening of the last day shown in the calendar below. This custom comes from the story of creation in the book of Genesis, chapter 1. On each of the seven days of creation, the phrase repeats: "And there was evening, and there was morning." Because Genesis mentions evening first, and then morning, Jews view their days as starting at night, followed by the morning.

The New Year of the Jewish calendar also differs from Western nations like the United States which observe the start of each year on January 1. The Jewish New Year begins on Rosh Hashanah, which takes place in September or October. 

Feast Day Celebrations

Feasts like Rosh Hashanah or the Feast of Trumpets are usually celebrated by members of the Jewish faith, but they have significance for Christians as well. The apostle Paul said in Colossians 2:16-17 that these festivals and celebrations were a shadow of the things to come through Jesus Christ. Although Christians may not commemorate these holidays in the traditional biblical sense, understanding these Jewish festivals can broaden the believer's understanding of a shared heritage. 

The Feast of Lots, also known as Purim, marks how Queen Esther of Persia saved the Jewish people. Passover commemorates the feast of the unleavened bread, which was one of the first feasts God told the Jewish people to observe. It marks how the Israelites were delivered from slavery. Feast of Weeks, or Shavuot, celebrates the harvest.

The Jewish New Year is Feast of Trumpets or Rosh Hashanah. Also known as the Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur is a time to repent for one's sins. Feast of Tabernacles or Sukkot
remembers Israel's 40-year journey in the wilderness. Rejoicing in the Torah, or Simchat Torah,
marks the completion of the annual Torah reading cycle. And Feast of Dedication, or Hanukkah,
celebrates the Maccabees' victory over Greek oppression and the rededication of the Temple.

These Jewish holidays are moveable feasts and fall on different dates depending on the calendar year.

Bible Feasts Calendar 2018-2022

Holidays begin at sundown on the evening of the previous day.

Year 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022

Feast of Lots (Purim)

Commemorates the salvation of the Jewish people through the heroism of Queen Esther.
March 1 March 21 March 10 Feb 26 March 17

Passover (Pesach)
Commemorates Israel's deliverance from slavery in Egypt.

March 31-April 7 April 19-27 April 9-16 March 28-April 4 April 16-23

Feast of Weeks / Pentecost (Shavuot)
Celebrates the harvest.

May 20-21 June 8-10 May 29-30 May 17-18 June 5-6
Jewish Year 5779 5780 5781 5782 5783

Feast of Trumpets (Rosh Hashanah)
Jewish New Year for the repentance from sin.

Sept 10-11 Sept 30-Oct 1 Sept 19-20 Sept 7-8 Sept 26-27

Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur)
Most holy day of the Jewish calendar when the high priest made an atoning sacrifice for the sins of the people.

​​Sept 19 Oct 9 Sept 28 Sept 16 Oct 5

Feast of Tabernacles (Sukkot)
Week long Fall festival commemorating the 40-year journey of the Israelites in the wilderness.

Sept 24-30 Oct 14-20 Oct 3-10 Sept 21-27 Oct 10-16

Rejoicing in the Torah (Simchat Torah)
Marks the completion of the annual Torah reading cycle.

Oct 2 Oct 22 Oct 11 Sept 29 Oct 18

Feast of Dedication (Hanukkah)
Celebrates the Maccabees' victory over Greek oppression and the rededication of the Temple.

Dec 2-10 Dec 23-30 Dec 11-18 Nov 29-Dec 6 Dec 19-26